‘Tennis-elbow’ – a repetitive strain injury

The Tennis Elbow refers to an overuse injury, a repetitive straining of the muscles that attach to the bones of the arm at height of the elbow. Biologically this injury is termed lateral epicondylitis. The so called Golfer´s Elbow, is similar to the Tennis Elbow, however affects the inner area of the elbow joint, while the Tennis Elbow involves the outer area of the elbow. The Golfer´s Elbow is denoted as medial epicondylitis. It is the different swing movements that depict the focal point of trauma locality, and differentiate the Tennis- from the Golfer´s- elbow injury.

While overexertion is a frequent cause of this type of trauma, a direct impact to the area of the elbow may likewise promote this injury. Epicondylitis describes the irritation and inflammation that develops at the sides of the elbows epicondyles in the event of such physical trauma. Pain, swelling and tenderness may be symptoms experienced at the locality, and mobility of the affected arm is strongly restricted, as very painful.

None of these injuries have to be caused by playing tennis or golf. However athletes conducting physical activity using their arms in specific swing movements are more predisposed to such an injury. House or garden work can likewise be the cause of such trauma and can result in these injuries.

Conventional 1st aid measures to promote relief are the R.I.C.E.R recommendations. Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate the affected arm, and if there is no relief Refer to a doctor.

Some homeopathic remedies that may assist recovery from this type of injury are: Arnica, Belladonna, Bryonia, Rhus tox., Ruta

 

 

 

References:

  • Clarke, J. (1994) A Dictionary of practical materia medica New Delhi: B.Jain publishers Ltd.

  • Morgan, Lyle (1988) Homeopathic treatment of Sports Injuries, Rochester: Healing Arts Press.

  • Walker, Brad (2007) The Anatomy of Sports Injuries, Chichester: Lotus publishing.

 

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